Andrew Targhetta Defends Thesis on Ultra-low Energy Asymmetric Cryptography

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Andrew Targhetta Defends Thesis on Ultra-low Energy Asymmetric Cryptography

Last week, Andrew Targhetta defended his thesis on ultra-low energy asymmetric cryptography. Andrew’s thesis discussed the use and design of an ultra-low energy co-processor that can be implemented in environments with strict power requirements. The co-processor reduces the energy cost to create secure communication channels with asymmetric cryptography, also known as public key cryptography.

A specific example mentioned was an implanted medical device that needs to communicate wirelessly. The secure communication channel can be used to monitor the patient remotely, while protecting the patient from outside monitoring or malicious intent. The reduced power consumption while maintaining device security means the implanted device will last longer and will be safer for the patient.

Andrew’s contributions in this field include a in depth analysis of the power cost  of asymmetric cryptography on multiple hardware and software configurations, two accelerator designs that maintain or potentially improve performance while significantly lowering energy costs, and a detailed implementation of his work.

Andrew Targhetta is a PhD candidate at Texas A&M University advised by CESG professor Dr. Paul Gratz. Andrew’s research interests are in hardware software co-design, computer architecture, trusted computing, and cryptography. He has accepted a full time offer at Sandia National Laboratories and will be working there after graduation.