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CESG Seminar: Microwave Superconducting Circuits

Last week, Friday April 24th, Dr. Kyle Sundqvist gave a talk on microwave superconducting circuits. In particular, he described SQUID, or Superconducting Quantum Interference Device, and the role of superconducting circuits and their role in quantum optics and information.

Superconducting quantum computing is a form of quantum information implementation that utilizes superconducting electrodes. Unlike other units of quantum computing, this integrated superconducting circuit involved in a qubit is a multi-level system. Dr. Sundqvist describes SQUID, which acts as the Josephson inductance in the superconducting qubit when it is unpumped. A flux-pumped SQUID provides an additional parallel element in the circuit. These superconducting circuits exhibit quantum mechanical properties on the macroscopic level which enables them to be used in quantum computing experiments and applications. Lately, parametric amplifiers have become more popular in the field, and SQUID provides a parametric gain in superconducting circuits.

Dr. Kyle Sundqvist is a visiting assistant professor here at Texas A&M, in the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Physics at the University of California, Berkeley. His primary studies are electron and hole transport in ultrapure, sub-Kelvin germanium for improved detectors in the search for particle dark matter. He also researched superconducting devices with application to quantum information.